Skip to main content
Community

The Standard on KQED Morning Edition: What Are the Chinese-language Campaign Ads Saying?

Written by Han LiPublished Feb. 09, 2022 • 5:56pm
Still of a Chinese-language ad citing a March 2021 SFGATE article. The ad reads “Alison Collins’ tweet refers [to] Asians as ‘Black house slaves.’" | Screenshot from YouTube

English

Political campaigns in San Francisco rely heavily on Chinese American voters, who make up a quarter of the city’s population. For the upcoming school board recall on Feb. 15, what, exactly, do the Chinese-language political ads say to the community?

In general, the messaging from the campaigns that support the recalls are similar in all languages. But some content is tailor-made for Chinese audiences.

Standard reporter Han Li discussed the ads with KQED’s Brian Watt and Scott Shafer on Morning Edition.

English

Han Li can be reached at [email protected]

A child is portrayed doing “online learning” with the caption, “My son and daughter are very frustrated and unhappy.” | Screenshot from YouTube

A Chinese-language ad featuring a parent quoted saying, “we cannot wait another year.” | Screenshot from YouTube

A Chinese-language ad showcasing a mother hovering over her son saying, “[My son] is playing games on the computer every day wasting time.” | Screenshot from YouTube

This Chinese-language ad says “Recall Collins, Lopez and Moliga.” | Screenshot from YouTube

A Chinese-language ad featuring a parent quoted saying, “we cannot wait another year.” | Screenshot from YouTube

A child is portrayed doing “online learning” with the caption, “[My kids] stay at home for online learning for 18 months.” | Screenshot from YouTube

A child is portrayed doing “online learning” with the caption, “My son and daughter are very frustrated and unhappy.” | Screenshot from YouTube

A Chinese-language ad featuring a parent quoted saying, “we cannot wait another year.” | Screenshot from YouTube


SF Turns Out for Vigil Honoring Young Black Trans Activist Ivory Smith

SF Turns Out for Vigil Honoring Young Black Trans Activist Ivory Smith


Dancer Yuanyuan Tan and Actor Joan Chen Honored for Breaking the ‘Bamboo Ceiling’

Dancer Yuanyuan Tan and Actor Joan Chen Honored for Breaking the ‘Bamboo Ceiling’


Meet the SF Artist Who Sells Her Work From Inside a Vintage Newsstand

Meet the SF Artist Who Sells Her Work From Inside a Vintage Newsstand


SFPD Increases Presence in Asian Neighborhoods After Mass Shootings

SFPD Increases Presence in Asian Neighborhoods After Mass Shootings


Half Moon Bay Shooting: Consulates Reach Out to Families of Victims in China, Mexico

Half Moon Bay Shooting: Consulates Reach Out to Families of Victims in China, Mexico



Stay on top of what’s happening in your city

SF’s most important stories, delivered straight to your inbox



By clicking Subscribe you confirm you have read and agree to our Terms of Use and acknowledge our Privacy Policy