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Union accuses City College of San Francisco chancellor of fraud

A bed of flowers planted in the shape of the letters "CCSF."
The American Federation of Teachers Local 2121, who represent City College of San Francisco faculty, alleges it uncovered evidence that Chancellor David Martin inserted false data into a 2020 budget document. | Source: Juliana Yamada/The Standard

The union representing City College of San Francisco’s faculty is accusing the school’s top official of falsifying financial information during ongoing labor talks.

The American Federation of Teachers Local 2121 said it uncovered evidence that Chancellor David Martin allegedly inserted false data into a 2020 budget document to make it look like recent unprecedented fund transfers were based on long-standing policies. 

They were not, the union says.

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In a letter sent to community allies earlier this week, the union said Martin deliberately misrepresented information to make up to $10 million in new state revenue unavailable for bargaining or for adding courses, services and campus repairs.

Meanwhile, faculty and staff face layoffs amid record inflation, the union said.

The district was contacted but did not immediately respond to a request for comment on the allegations.

The filing comes less than two months after Martin told college leaders and staff Thursday he would not seek an extension of his current contract, which concludes at the end of this academic year.

Tim Killikelly, former president of AFT 2121, said while differing budget priorities are expected, evidence of intentional fraud threatens the ability to have honest discussions about the college's finances.

“The point is the deliberate and unlawful misrepresentation of information,” Killikelly said in the letter. “It’s what that means for the ongoing health of our college."

The union said it filed the labor complaint to expose the alleged fraud and have a transparent budget debate focused on student needs.