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The Standard on KQED Morning Edition: What Are the Chinese-language Campaign Ads Saying?

Written by Han LiPublished Feb. 09, 2022 • 5:56pm
Still of a Chinese-language ad citing a March 2021 SFGATE article. The ad reads “Alison Collins’ tweet refers [to] Asians as ‘Black house slaves.’" | Screenshot from YouTube

Political campaigns in San Francisco rely heavily on Chinese American voters, who make up a quarter of the city’s population. For the upcoming school board recall on Feb. 15, what, exactly, do the Chinese-language political ads say to the community?

In general, the messaging from the campaigns that support the recalls are similar in all languages. But some content is tailor-made for Chinese audiences.

Standard reporter Han Li discussed the ads with KQED’s Brian Watt and Scott Shafer on Morning Edition.

Han Li can be reached at han@sfstandard.com


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