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Pride and Politics: But Make it Fashion!

Written by Juliana Yamada, Benjamin Fanjoy, Christina CampodonicoUpdated at Jun. 27, 2022 • 2:02pmPublished Jun. 27, 2022 • 10:56am
Teresa Moore blows a kiss at Pride in San Francisco, Calif., on Sunday, June 26, 2022. | Juliana Yamada/The Standard

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From glittering rainbow hats to sparkling red dresses, attendees of Pride-based events took to the streets of San Francisco on Sunday to make strong fashion statements about contemporary politics and personal identity.

Some dressed up to proudly show their most authentic selves. Others used the city’s streets as a runway to honor LGBTQ+ designers or make their voices heard on racial justice or gun control.

From the Pride Parade to the People’s March, San Franciscans showed their pride with an array of beautifully bold and unique styles.


Anthony Starlight, who attended their first Pride event this weekend, described Pride fashion as pure “self-expression.”

Anthony Starlight poses for a portrait at Pride in San Francisco, Calif., on Sunday, June 26, 2022. | Juliana Yamada/The Standard

To Starlight, Pride fashion is about “letting yourself shine.”

“I am wearing some sparkly hot shorts, a sparkly tank top that changes colors and I have a sequin cape and cat ears!” said the Folsom Street resident.

Meanwhile, Bruce Beaudette used their outfit to “bring attention to gun violence and make people think about gun reform.” 

Bruce Beaudette poses for a portrait at the People’s March in San Francisco Calif., on Sunday, June 26, 2022. | Ben Fanjoy for The Standard

For Sister Anya Streets, a member of the Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence, loud fashion in the time of pride and political upheaval has multiple purposes.

“I look like a big garish nun. This is a way to bring attention to myself—initially—but to then give it to those that I’m raising awareness and attention for.”

Sister Anya Streets poses for a portait at the People’s March in San Francisco Calif., on Sunday, June 26, 2022. | Ben Fanjoy for The Standard

Vincent Larios, 19, from Livermore, posed for a portrait at the Pride Parade, explaining that they’re “wearing all pink, big boots, a skirt, and a mesh top…because I think skirts make my ass look fat!”

Vincent Larios poses for a portrait at Pride in San Francisco, Calif., on Sunday, June 26, 2022. | Juliana Yamada/The Standard

Pinkie Roché, 59, who lives in the Tenderloin, sported a “very sequined outfit, from head to toe. I chose to wear it so that I can make other people smile and just feel good about themselves.”

Pinkie Roché attends Pride in San Francisco, Calif., on Sunday, June 26, 2022. | Juliana Yamada/The Standard

Breanna Sinclairé, the first trans woman to receive a master’s from the San Francisco Conservatory of Music’s opera program, posed for a portrait at the People’s March.

“This dress was designed by David Glamamore. Mr. David…he is a legendary LGBTQ+ gay icon. And he made this dress for me for a PBS special that was televised and recorded. But I wanted to wear it today because I want to carry on these legends and this legacy on my body.”

Breanna Sinclair poses for a porait at the People’s March in San Francisco Calif., on Sunday, June 26, 2022. | Ben Fanjoy for The Standard

John Weber, a Mission Bay resident, found multiple meanings in their People’s March ensemble.

“I decided to wear my Black Lives Matter shirt. The red represents the anger that I’m having and feeling about not only the Supreme Court decision, but everything that’s happening that’s taking away people’s rights. And the red also symbolizes the people who’ve died before us so that we can have the rights that we have. Pride is more than just the hue of the rainbows—there are Black and brown people that are a part of this.”

See Also

John Weber poses for a portrait at the People’s March in San Francisco Calif., on Sunday, June 26, 2022. | Ben Fanjoy for The Standard

Kelly Hart, a proud bisexual, posed for a portrait at the People’s March.

“I’m fortunate that I’ve always been out of the closet, but I also know that there are people who have yet to come out of the closet. Us being out, and being as flashy as we can—like this—it sends a message. It says, ‘Hey, be proud, stand out.’ That’s what it’s about,” said the father of two.

Kelly Hart poses for a portrait at the People’s March in San Francisco Calif., on Sunday, June 26, 2022. | Ben Fanjoy for The Standard

For Hizel, 26, dressing up extra is a regular occurance.

“I like to dress up like this on the regular! I’m wearing some heart glasses, to show love, and bright pink because I love pink, it’s fluffy, and it shows everything about San Francisco.”  

Hizel poses for a portrait at Pride in San Francisco, Calif., on Sunday, June 26, 2022. | Juliana Yamada/The Standard

Oakland resident Linda Gordon described her outfit as a type of scrapbook.

“This [outfit] is a combination of home-made and my travels that I’ve picked up from wherever I go to visit my gay friends, and they are important to me.”

Linda Gordon poses for a portrait at Pride in San Francisco, Calif., on Sunday, June 26, 2022. | Juliana Yamada/The Standard

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